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FAQ's

An initial consultation costs £49.50. Follow up visits are £49.50 each. We ask you to pay as you depart and to pay by card.
Everyone is different, and it will depend upon what your problem is. Some patients have conditions that will not respond to the treatments that we offer, and we will not see them after the initial consultation. We will refer these patients for other treatments, or investigations, via their GP. Most patients, however, will have a course of treatment. Often this will be 4-6 treatments initially to see how things improve. If the condition is something that can be completely resolved, that may be the end of it. Many patients have conditions that benefit from some form of preventative care, and choose to attend on a periodic basis, a bit like going to their dentist.
The initial consultation will take 45 minutes. Follow-up visits will take 30 minutes.
Yes. In order to examine you properly and to do ‘hands on’ treatment, we need you to change. We ask that you change down to your underwear and will give you a hospital-style gown to wear that opens at the back.
In the past: yes. Currently: no. Sadly a number of years ago the major insurance companies moved the financial goal posts, making it all but impossible for patients who had health insurance to get their chiropractic costs refunded. However, some of the smaller health insurance companies do continue to pay for this. So, it’s best to check with your health insurance company.

Ring and ask our reception team. Or email them: receptionist@abingdonchiropractic.co.uk  If it’s a clinical question, just ask the chiropractor to call you. You can even email the chiropractors directly: andrew@abingdonchiropractic.co.uk  and tara@abingdonchiropractic.co.uk and ask them questions directly.

No. You can come to us anyway. Just make an appointment. We might write to your GP, with your permission, if we feel that you would benefit from any additional medical investigations, or if we feel that it is appropriate that your GP knows what treatment you are having here.
No. In the past we used to take X-Rays of patients’ spines. These days, MRI scans are available, which give us much more information. We refer some of our patients to the MRI unit at Cheltenham for MRI scans. The Cheltenham clinic gives our patients rapid access to MRI scans at an extremely good price. That being said, most of our patients do not need an MRI scan.
Generally, it doesn’t. Sometimes massage techniques can be uncomfortable, but normally ‘in a good way’. You probably know the meaning of ‘good pain’ where a stretching or massage process produces discomfort, but your body knows that it feels good! The ‘clicks’ of manipulative treatment can take a little getting used to, but most patients actually enjoy it. Sounds weird, we know, but it seems to be the case!
Look at our Google reviews. These mostly say it all. Andrew and Tara have decades of clinical experience between them. Tara has a particular interest in the treatment of pregnant ladies and in the neurological development of children. Andrew is also trained as a sonographer and has a particular interest in the assessment of patients who have back pain of organic origin. We really like our patients and enjoy seeing them. Many of our patients have been coming to us for decades. That’s important to us. We treat you like you’re family. Simple.
No. There is limited parking available in the multi-storey carpark opposite. Otherwise you are best to park in the Waitrose carpark or the adjacent council carparks.

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If you’re ready to book an appointment or have any questions then please get in touch. You can send us a message, book online or contact us by phone or email.

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